Friday, January 04, 2008

except for scenic designers

gaby was here (andres too)

When you see an aging building or a rusted bridge, you are seeing nature and man working together. If you paint over a building, there is no more magic to that building. But if it is allowed to age, then man has built it and nature has added into it — it's so organic.

But often people wouldn't think to permit that, except for scenic designers.


Film director David Lynch speaking of Beauty in Catching the Big Fish: Meditation, Consciousness, and Creativity. Another one from the Tattered Cover haul.

Which I summarized in brief in an email to a friend in which I suggested he was welcome to the book now that I'd finished it:

p.s. & unrelated: just finished the david lynch book. strangely rambling & yet concise take on the connection between his meditation practise and his work in film/the creative process. a really light but enjoyable read. with some bizarreness like a chapter entitled: "The box & the key"[1] followed by a single sentence: "I don't have a clue what those are."

the book's a little like a david lynch film, actually.


Needless to say, he didn't take me up on my offer.

[1] A Mullholland Drive reference, no?



Update: Speaking of David Lynch, @vasta just tweeted this: David Lynch on the iPhone »

3 comments:

Lolabola said...

he didn't? that sounds like a fabulous little read

Anonymous said...

There is a steel used for bridges called Cor-Ten that is meant to rust. It builds up an oxide coating, which hypotheticaly protects it from further degradation. I've seen a lot of bridges and overpasses in Texas built with it. Lynch would dig it.

B1-67er

Anonymous said...

Come to think of it, this effect is super common but often suttle. The whitish patina on the Saint Lewis arch captured in your photo a few months back is caused by the oxide coating on the stainless. When it is new or polished it can be as bright as a mirror, but a few weeks of weathering softens the brightness and tends to look white instead of silver from a distance.
The same is true of aluminum. It can be polished to a very bright finish, but an oxide coating forms in days or weeks that gives the aluminum it's typical soft misty glow.
B1-67er

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